India Cheapest Major Economy; Australia Most Expensive: Survey

DESPITE high inflation rate, India is the cheapest major economy in the world, according to a survey of global prices of products that are comparable across countries. According to a report by German banking giant Deutsche Bank, a weaker Indian rupee has allowed India to remain the cheapest major economy in the world despite persistently suffering the highest inflation rate. “The fact that India still runs a large current account deficit illustrates that being competitive is more than just being cheap,” the report titled The Random Walk, Mapping the World’s Prices 2014 added.

Australia is overall the most expensive major economy, while the United States is the cheapest developed country. Brazil remains very expensive for a developing country; the survey said adding that China remains very cheap in some categories like car rentals, while for a number of branded goods, it is more expensive than the U.S. In many categories China is steadily converging on U.S. prices. “For a number of branded goods like Levi’s jeans, Adidas shoes and iPhones, we found it to be more expensive than the United States,” the Deutsche Bank report said.

Singapore remains, by far, the most expensive place to buy a car and Hong Komg for renting office space. Zurich was also found to be exceptionally expensive in many categories so much so that a haircut in Zurich can cost about fifteen times that in an Indian city. Kuala Lumpur and Mumbai to be the cheapest places for a weekend holiday while Sydney is the most expensive.

It is much cheaper to spend a weekend in Tokyo than in Sao Paulo or Moscow. Indian cities are the cheapest places for a movie-and-burger date, while Cape Town, Johannesburg, Manila and Mexico City are also affordable. London is the most expensive city for a date.

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2 thoughts on “India Cheapest Major Economy; Australia Most Expensive: Survey

  1. And if you check World Vision literature on slavery, you find that it is campaigning against slavery in India (among other places).

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