The odd facts about St Patrick’s Day

734029_10200583544091722_1135379858_n

There are only two kinds of people in the world; the Irish and those who wish they were – Irish saying

THE fiery Saint Patrick, whose life is marked around the globe today, was not even Irish.
The Apostle of the Irish, and the man credited with banishing both snakes and paganism from the Emerald Isle, might have been born around the year 390 in Glasgow, according to recent research. Other historians say his birthplace might be Cumbria, Wales, Northhampton and even France.
Respected British archeologist Nicholas Fuentes claimed St Patrick was born in a Roman town that is now known as Battersea in London.
His real name wasn’t even Patrick. It was Maewyn Succat.

But no matter. St Pat has long been claimed as Irish by both Protestant and Catholics over the world. Even the Japanese are celebrating with a huge parade through Tokyo today.
St Pat impressed the wild Irish with inventive teachings – he used the three-leafed shamrock to explain the doctrine of the trinity – and miracles supposedly supported his words
St Patrick probably died about 460 but the place of his burial is unknown.
It’s traditional to wear green on St Patrick’s Day. But in Ireland the color was long considered to be unlucky. Irish superstition holds that green is the favorite color of leprechauns, who are likely to steal people, especially children, who wear too much of the colour.
St Patrick’s Day celebrations have been , naturally, always big in Ireland.
But until the early 1970s, successive governments had banned alcohol on St Patrick’s Day in all areas of Dublin except the annual Dog Show.
Not surprisingly, the attendances at this event were huge.
Irish writer Fiann O’Brien once wrote in his daily newspaper column that he had spent his usual drunken St Patrick’s Day at the Dog Show but the place seemed to be full of yapping hounds.
He wondered what possessed people to take their pets to such a place.

Advertisements

One thought on “The odd facts about St Patrick’s Day

  1. “But until the early 1970s, successive governments had banned alcohol on St Patrick’s Day in all areas of Dublin except the annual Dog Show.
    Not surprisingly, the attendances at this event were huge.”

    Too funny

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s