How stuff works

ATHEISM proclaimed science was God. But scientific advances often coincided with moral confusion and environmental disaster. Science was expected to reveal a universe that was random and mechanical. Instead, science uncovered even more layers of intricate order that suggested an intelligent design.

The discovery that the universe began with a creation-like Big Bang around 13 billion years ago encouraged the argument for a creator as the first cause of nature. The discovery that the fundamental laws of nature contained constants that appear to have been fine-tuned so that the cosmos would eventually yield intelligent life, lent new credence to the design argument for God’s existence.

Quantum theory made the cosmos seem more like a thought than like a machine. Modern science tells us the that our universe cannot sustain itself, that it’s dependent on something outside of itself, and that our universe had a beginning.

We are seeing not a battle between God and science, but a discovery of God in science.

The German physicist Max Born, who pioneered quantum mechanics, said: “Those who say that the study of science makes a man an atheist must be rather silly people.”

Einstein said the world was like a well-constructed crossword puzzle. “You can suggest any number of words, but only one will fit all the facts,” he said.

Science can’t “observe” God. But we can all observe a universe that yields evidence of either God’s handiwork, or an amazing accident. The evidence has to point one way or the other. And scientific discoveries of this past century clearly show that our universe is no accident, that there is an intelligent designer behind it all.

Albert Camus said death was philosophy’s only problem. One of atheism’s great failings is that it cannot offer any comfort in the face of death.

David the Psalmist said we could not hide from God. Ever. Anywhere. We either faced him in this life or the next — one way or the other.

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15 thoughts on “How stuff works

  1. !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    If I had a week I’d gleefully debunk every one of the above assertions!

    But I MUST get to bed: it’s been long ~ and hairy ~ three days.

    But here, by the purest coincidence (if there WERE such a thing as ‘coincidence’), is a little link that arrived at about the same time as your script above.

    You cite:- “Science can’t “observe” God. But we can all observe a universe that yields evidence of either God’s handiwork, or an amazing accident.”

    My email:- ( ‘God of the jelly-beans….whoooooooooooo!’)

    http://www.wimp.com/wisdomcrowd/

    Moral: you’ve gotta be able to SEE the dots before you can join them.

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  2. PS. The universe is neither ‘god’s’ work nor an accident. There can be no effect without a cause. Physical effects can ONLY have physical causes.

    …and incidentally, the demonstrated existence of the ‘god-particle’ once and for all demolishes the entire apologia of creationism. (And confirms/is confirmed by the laws of thermodynamics.)
    The matter spewed forth from the Big Bang has always existed and will always exist in one form or another.

    All the Big Bang ‘created’ was the current cycle of universal matter at work and play.

    ” The discovery that the fundamental laws of nature contained constants that appear to have been fine-tuned so that the cosmos would eventually yield intelligent life,….”
    …. remains to be proven! 😆

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    • ….But seriously, folks, those “fundamental”, fine-tuned constants have nothing to do with ‘yielding life’ ~ let alone intelligent life.

      We KNOW it was god playing in the dirt wot done it, don’t we?
      …but, given the timing, the odds are that it was an accident anyway.

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  3. ATHEISM proclaimed science was God.
    When ?

    But scientific advances often coincided with moral confusion and environmental disaster.
    Such as ?

    Science was expected to reveal a universe that was random and mechanical.
    Why ?

    Like

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