Glass half full

THERE’S the story of a journalist interviewing two workers at a construction-site where a new church was being built. He asked what they were doing. One said: “I’m a brick-layer’’ but the other said “I’m building a cathedral’’. Perspective changes everything.

Jesus’s Sermon on the Mount is a surprising prescription for happiness. Implied in the Beatitudes is the idea that true happiness isn’t the same as immediate happiness.

Writer C.S. Lewis noted that he didn’t become a Christian in order to increase his present happiness. He said a bottle of port would have done that.

Lewis said if you were looking for immediate gratification, you might as well buy yourself a new purse or a new car rather than Christianity. The happiness Jesus promised had to be cultivated.

Author Alexandre Dumas said happiness was like those palaces in fairy tales whose gates are guarded by dragons.
“We must fight in order to conquer it,’’ he said.

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4 thoughts on “Glass half full

  1. I know what it’s like to fight for your happiness. Sometimes it’s harder than others. Sometimes you don’t feel appreciated by those around you and you have to fight a battle inside of your own head to tell yourself that your worthy of the happiness that is trying to break through all of the dark and gloom. So, don’t forget, you are worthy of HAPPINESS! And never give up! Also, you can ask God to help you get there, sometimes it seems as though He’s not listening, but He is. And sometimes you have to go through what’s in front of you to get to the part He wants you to be at. So, seek your Happiness, and God will help you through the gloom to do so. 🙂

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  2. ??? “Implied in the Beatitudes is the idea that true happiness isn’t the same as immediate happiness.”
    Even if it were possible to postpone ‘happiness’ to some future time (which of course it isn’t) wouldn’t it THEN (at that future time when it was ‘exercised’) be “immediate” to that moment?

    As someone who put in a difficult day yesterday achieving something really great in the company of a couple of people of the kind that make you proud of belonging to the same species (just for once!), I can vouch for the fact that ‘true’ and ‘immediate’ happiness are indistinguishable.

    If, instead, I’d spent the day standing around the ‘Mount’ listening to some procrastinator waffle on about what I SHOULD be doing in order to be happy later there’d be that much less happiness in the world this morning.

    I guess it all depends on the message one receives.

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